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Leadership in Learning Technology – personal reflection on building a CMALT portfolio | ocTEL 2014
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Leadership in Learning Technology – personal reflection on building a CMALT portfolio

June 11, 2014 in CMALT, Course Information

As someone who has a small role in tutoring on the course and with a CMALT portfolio in the drafting stages, this blog post is about sharing my personal reflections on how one might use experience of leadership and management to help gain CMALT.

If you want to find out more, visit the CMALT ocTEL group or refer to the CMALT pages on ALT’s website. Answers to most frequently asked questions will probably be covered in the Guidelines for CMALT Candidates and Assessors.

In previous blog posts in this series, we have covered all sections of the portfolio, including Operational Issues, Learning, teaching and assessment, the wider context and Communication. So this week, I want to reflect on how having experience of leadership in different forms can provide a useful starting point for defining a specialist area, at least one of which every portfolio needs to include.

Leading people

One way to think about this is to concentrate on people. The way in which human beings and technology interact, particularly in learning, teaching and assessment, is complex. Our relationships with people are similarly often mediated by technology and using tools effectively to create productive working or teaching relationships is always a challenge. If I was going to write about leading people, this is where I would start. I would ask, what do I use technology for in this context? How can I give examples of this? Does is work? How could I improve? What are the limitations? Audio snapshots of “Hello, can anyone hear me?” would certainly feature in this section for me.

Leading projects

As Julie and Brian, the lead tutors for this week’s topic, mentioned in their introduction, projects involving Learning Technology can easily get off track, become expensive or otherwise change direction. My experience is that the more distributed a project team, the more technology plays a part in making things work – the harder it can be to get things done (let alone on budget and on time). While I realise there are accomplished ambassadors of intelligent project management software I am not one of them. So if project management or leadership in delivering or steering projects would be my focus I would personally write about how getting people motivated, tools to work and deadlines not to slide… with a lot of reflection on the kinds of tools I found work in different contexts.

Leading innovation

A final example, leading innovation, for me is all about the concept of getting decision makers involved and understanding how innovation using Learning Technology works and why teachers, learners or technologist want to do something. I have had so many experiences of change happening, a technology or gadget getting adopted because someone tried it out first hand – got a personal experience of the potential of a new technology. These moments, when you see someone discovering for themselves how exciting [insert a more appropriate term as needed] something is or could be – these moments can shape the way of things to come. Taking risks, and innovation always involves risk, is much easier when those who manage the risk can understand why they are doing so – what the potential they are supporting or promoting is.

Whatever your specialist area, whatever your experience the key point is that the process of drafting your CMALT portfolio will encourage you to reflect on what you do as a leader and on your own learning.

I hope that for the remainder of this week #ocTEL across the forums, your own platforms and at this week’s webinar on Thursday at 12.30 (BST) you will find your inspiration for adding to your own CMALT portfolio in the making.

1 response to The open course you cannot fail…

  1. Dear Maren

    “Lurkers” vs “Silent participants”?

    Here are a few other terms that could be used:

    vicarious learners?
    silent participants?
    viewer?
    Non-public user?
    legitimate peripheral participator?
    eyeballers?
    virtual participant?
    marginal participant?
    onlooker?
    passive observer?
    cognitive apprentices?
    potential member?
    proximate member?
    sympathiser?
    supporter?
    listener?
    tacit member?

    See Let’s get more positive about the term ‘lurker’

    http://www.groups-that-work.com/GTWedit/GTW/lurkerprojectcopworkshopspring03rev.pdf

    Which term best reflects the degree/ style/ of learning? If you read a book, but never talk about it, have you learned any less?

    Best wishes

    Charlotte

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