Hello from Mars

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Martin Hawksey 6 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #1364

    Paul Rettey
    Participant

    In keeping with the hello world intro, here is a picture from Curiosity looking at Earth and the Moon from Mars

    http://www.nasa.gov/jpl/msl/earth-view-from-mars-20140206/#.U15BaVf_PNx

    You can also follow Curiosity here: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/mission/whereistherovernow/

    And Hello from me!

    So on that note, isn’t it amazing that we’re able to view via social media and the internet whats happening on Mars or indeed anywhere in the world and where an internet connection  is available? It demonstrates the power of communication over vast distances, as well as improving our understanding of what’s around us. To me this is an example of the sheer power of technological and social networks.

    On that note…MOOC’s I’m no expert but I’ll pitch in with my initial views, I don’t think they’ve fully matured and I’ve heard anecdotal stories of high drop out rates. To my mind they would work better where access to schooling is poor but access to the internet is good.

  • #3693

    Martin Hawksey
    Keymaster

    Hi Paul (again 😉 – drop out rates are an interesting one. <span style=”color: #000000;”> Participating in an ocTEL feedback session at altc2013 it was interesting to reflect on the mindset people bring to these types of ‘courses’. The word ‘course’ itself also reinforces the idea that if you don’t finish then you have somehow failed. At altc2013 Stephen Downes was kind enough to drop in to the </span>ALT-C Live studio and talk about MOOCs with Seb Schmoller<span style=”color: #000000;”>. As part of this Stephen explained that the conception of ‘a course’ can be misleading. Stephen has subsequently written up more about what he means in </span>this post.<span style=”color: #000000;”> Changing people’s perception can be challenging and you can read more about </span>how ocTEL is ‘the open course you cannot fail’<span style=”color: #000000;”>. </span>

    You also might like this video of a talk of mapping and measuring social network connections

  • #4133

    Paul Rettey
    Participant

    Thanks Martin,

    That’s very interesting, I follow Seb on twitter and we’ve exchanged a few views over MOOC’s I’m all for the concept, my view is it’s still work in progress and their must a place where they can be used well.  I’ll have to do more reading on the train! There is a lot of stuff already in the course to digest.

    I keep thinking back to Project Tuva (you might have heard of it) This to me is a good example of open learning, freely available to all that you can go through anytime you want. It lacks the social media elements, and I think it’s better for it because the subject matter it in-depth and the last thing you want is a distraction.

    In a way the dynamics here share similarities to the real world. In my mind there is a lot of people in this space all going at a particular speed, it’s kind of like a conference. Where we all meet and greet, find our way around, then do an assigned task and we have 6 weeks (well really 5 as this is the induction week) to complete everything, (or nothing).

    It’s an experience one way (or the other) but regardless we take away what works, and are enriched by meeting new people.

    I get the feeling though that we’re on the cusp of something really revolutionary, and once it ‘clicks’ it’ll accelerate the transformation of education.

  • #7845

    Martin Hawksey
    Keymaster

    Hi Paul – given the time it’s taken me to respond you’ll see I at a very different speed ;). I love the conference analogy, a similar one I’ve used along those lines is a music festivals. Similar to the conferences we come together for a defined event and along the way you make connections , old and new, and hopefully along the way have some fun. I admire your enthusiasm that we are on the verge of something. One of the big challenges is the general mindset in this area. Recently I was taken by a talk highlighting the lost opportunities in computing science from the 60/70s  which resonates with education today (my spin on this is here)

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