A lecture-streaming project

This topic contains 6 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Simon Fokt 6 years, 3 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #24366

    Moira Sarsfield
    Participant

    I’ve written here about a project to stream lectures to an overflow room…

    http://eforenhancing.wordpress.com/2014/06/11/project-stream/

    Like both Julie and Lisa, I found that staffing issues were a key aspect of the project.

  • #24826

    Rose Heaney
    Moderator

    Staffing be  it technical (or learning tech) in this case or academic as in Lisa’s example and several distance learning programmes I have known here is a vexed issue. Too many assumptions are often made about the availability of already busy and over-committed people.

    Good to see how you managed to stand your ground Moira in this instance but sometimes this is harder – perhaps when people are new or just don’t feel able to for whatever reason. Or in some cases we don’t see it coming. When we get caught up in projects with unrealistic expectations we need to learn to assert our position without being utterly inflexible of course – that in itself is a valuable skill.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 3 months ago by  Rose Heaney.
  • #24839

    Rose Heaney
    Moderator

    … and as an addendum to this – academic staff who are involved in development projects often don’t assert themselves and say they’re too busy. However they often don’t deliver either, which is worse.

  • #24913

    Simon Fokt
    Participant

    Sounds like quite a project. I particularly like the fact that you decided to employ someone who will make sure that the technical part works – lecturers are often expected to deal with this sort of issues themselves, but we all know that setting up multiple screens and projectors is already quite tricky, save if you have to do it in multiple rooms. This must have saved people a lot of stress and worry.

    I wondered about the things you mentioned about students actually preferring to be in the overflow room. Would that not be an example of how technology can actually hinder learning? You mention that one of the reasons was that they didn’t want to be asked questions by the lecturer – but surely even if they don’t like being asked, it’s probably good for them if they sometimes are? So being in the overflow room could result in decreased attention to the lecture (and since you mention that they used laptops, likely also increased attention to facebook).

    I understand though that this was a necessary solution forced by the over-recruitment situation. I hope that the university will make sure that this doesn’t happen again, and class sizes remain within sensible limits.

  • #25838

    guy saward
    Participant

    As ever, I want a like button for all the positive contributions from Moira, Rose and Simon. I guess I can just favourite the whole conversation!

  • #26196

    Moira Sarsfield
    Participant

    Thanks all for the comments. I am now back to ocTEL after two weeks of exams – invigilating not sitting them, but it still  took up all my hours and energy. It’s catch up time!

    Rose, I think that you raise an important issue about staff agreeing to do work, but then being too busy and not delivering.  I suppose this should become part of the communication required around a project – checking and double-checking that people have properly understood the time needed for their part of the work, questioning/confirming that they can do it, allowing them to say no. The earlier we know it’s a problem, the better.

    Simon, I was somewhat joking with my comment about avoiding the lecturer’s questions. I think that most of the students who preferred the overflow room were actually more mature students, who disliked the distractions of the main lecture theatre, and didn’t feel the need to be ‘with the gang’. There was a good, studious atmosphere there. The over-recruitment was a one-off in our department.

    Thanks, Guy. 🙂

     

    • #26315

      Simon Fokt
      Participant

      That’s fair enough! Thanks for the reply. I can see how mature students would prefer it for the more peaceful atmosphere – then again, I would think (apparently wrongly and perhaps unfairly) that mature students would be more used to traditional methods of lecture delivery and thus would prefer to be in the lecture theatre. It’s good to challenge such assumptions – thanks!

The topic ‘A lecture-streaming project’ is closed to new replies.